Welland History .ca

Historic EVENTS in and around Welland

The EVENTS in and around Welland

This is where you will find interesting stories of
various EVENTS in and around Welland.
Currently we have a lot of stories about
businesses and their owners in the 1800s and 1900s.

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PROPOSAL TO BUILD SUBWAY UNDER RAILWAY TRACKS ON MUIR STREET

Spitzer-Rorick Company Notified By Council to Take Up Hydro Debentures or Stand Loss on Re-sale-Welland Street to be Opened Over G.T.R.-Advertise for Tenders for Next Year’s Paving.

[Welland Telegraph, 7 November 1913]

SEEN AT A GLANCE

The Council:

  • Discussed $20,000 viaduct, under the railway tracks on Muir St.
  • Protested against trains blocking crossing on Muir Street and re-affirmed their request for overhead bridges.
  • Gave notice of building debenture company liable for loss on sale.
  • Called for tenders for next year’s paving.
  • Referred subdivision plans to engineer for general layout.
  • Decided to open Welland St. over the G.T.R.
  • Heard mayor announce that he would give instructions to have curfew law enforced.
  • Gave chief of police two weeks holidays.

For the town of Welland, the township of Crowland, the M.C.R. the local railway company to jointly share the cost of a subway under the railway tracks crossing Muir Street was a suggestion given consideration at the council meeting Monday evening.

The proposal was brought about by a communication from the Dominion Railway Board stating that an overhead bridge over the tracks a suggested by the council was not feasible for the reason the pedestrians would not use it because of the height of the ascent necessary.

The board stated that approval had been given the request of the electric railway to cross at grade, but the M.C.R. was raising strong objections and it was now proposed to have the street railway be a subway under the tracks. To protect pedestrians crossing the tracks at Muir street and at Plymouth Road the railway would be willing to pay the same proportion as at present for gates to be operated day and night at Muir Street and to have the gates at Plymouth Road continued in operation at night as well as in the daytime.

“Crowland would consent to this arrangement,” advised the solicitor.

After the last fatal accident at the Muir Street crossing a flagman was stationed there and the board has not yet given an order for his release.

TRAINS BLOCK CROSSING

Deputy Reeve Crow explained that the idea of the gates was to give workingmen going across to the factories a chance to get across the tracks when the crossing was blocked by trains.

Aud. Hughes said the public was a better judge as to the accessibly of these crossings and the public wanted the overhead bridges.

“If the railway blocks the crossing we should summon witnesses and prosecute,” opned Ald. Reilly.

The solicitor was instructed to review suggestions to have the bridges built and to advise the board that the town favored the gates and the arrangement of payment.

WOULD COST $20,000

C.J. Laughlin proposed the scheme for building a viaduct. The cost would be about $20,000 but it could be borne jointly. There would have to be sixteen-foot clearance and the railway could raise its tracks up a distance, commencing the grade a thousand feet back. This would eliminate further trouble.

“We are now considering the building of a private subway for our line half way between the canal and Muir Street,” he said.

HOLD DEBENTURE CO. LIABLE

The council decided to give the Spitzer-Rorick Company notice to either take up the $40,000 received…. Hydro Electric debentures used would again advertise them for sale and hold the company liable for the loss occasioned by the re-sale.

NEXT YEAR’S PAVING

Instructions were given the engineers to advertise for tenders for paving North Main Street, Division Street, Hellems Avenue, Cross Street and Burgar Street, between main and Division.

The kinds of pavement on which tenders are to be received are brick, rocmac, asphalt, bitulithic, concrete and reinforced concrete.

Ald. Hughes explained that sewers on these streets could be put down this fall and that the water commission were now putting down their connections.

A motion to have the sewer connection on these streets put in was carried.

“Is it the intention of the council to pave North Main?” asked Deputy Reeve Crow.

“Yes,” replied Ald. Hatt. “We are making temporary improvements on the street this fall out as far as Elm, which is as far as the pavement will extend. From there to the end, the street is being made permanent with stone.”

DOESN’T FAVOR CONCRETE

D.T. Black, city engineer, in his report on the kinds of pavement, said concrete was short-lived unless reinforced and then it would cost as much as any other pavement. Cracks would develop and the abrasive action wear away the surface. He thought it better to use some other kind of paving.

FROWN ON SUBDIVISION

A motion to approve of the plans of Welled Heights subdivision was replaced with a reference to the engineer after the council had fully discussed it. The streets are not in accordance with older streets already laid out and the council felt that permission to open such streets would lead to trouble, expense and confusion in the future.

Ald. Hughes was surprised that the street committee would recommend the acceptance of such a plan.

Ald. Reilly complained about the lots being small but his entire objection was to the irregularity of the streets. “They are not streets, but pockets,” he said.

“They are sixty-six feet wide,” said Ald. Hatt. “We have nothing to say about the size of the lots.”

Ald. Traver said such subdivisions had a tendency to scatter the town and run up the cost of local improvements.

The engineer will make arrangements to have the streets in the property conform to other and established streets and make such preparations that any other property nearby if opened in the future must be in harmony with the general plan. All streets must also be opened out.

NEW SEWERS

The sewer committee were instructed to advertise for tenders for sewers on Fraser, Edward, Hooker, Welland and Cady Streets and to put in sewer services on Division, Hellems Ave., North Main and Burgar Streets.

OPEN UP NEW STREET

Welland Street will be opened over the G.T.R. tracks, is spite of a letter from the G.T.R. stating that yards might be opened at that point and giving preference to Asher St., as a crossing over their tracks, the council decided that Welland Street would be the most advantageous place for the new crossing.

The street committee were instructed to take the necessary steps to have the street opened. Property from Burgar Street to the track must be expropriated.

AUTO ACCIDENTS OVER WEEK-END

Humberstone Woman Hurt When Steering Wheel Locks Near Coyle

Humberstone News

[Welland Telegraph, 10 October 1911]

Mr. and Mrs. Munzio Paolone and their two children of Erie Street, Humberstone, all suffered injury when the wheel of their automobile became locked west of Coyle, Sunday evening. Mrs. Paolone’s injuries necessitated her removal to the Welland County Hospital. She was suffering from cuts.

Paolone reported the accident to Chief of Police Jones of Crowland and said the wheel of the car locked as he was attempting to drive around a curve on the River Road. The car ran into a tree.

Whitmore Noxel of Humberstone Township escaped possible serious injury Saturday night when the Ford touring car he was driving turned turtle on the detour road at Dain City. It is said the car upset owing to the rough condition of the road. Mr. Noxel was not hurt, managing to crawl from the auto after it had overturned.

FIRM OF HILL & HILL

Humberstone News

[Welland Tribune, 4 January 1895]

Mr. W.M. Hill, the enterprising and hustling senior partner of Hill & Hill, is now sole proprietor of the business in this village-the firm of Hill & Hill having dissolved on Wednesday and Mr. W.M. Hill succeeding to the business. It is a well-known fact that the latter gentleman has always been the business head of the firm, and with full control of the management the Hill store should rank as a leader more decidedly than ever. Mr. Hill’s enterprise has built up a large trade which, under his sole management must show marked increase in the future as it has in the past. We congratulate the village on retaining a store that will always be the means of drawing patronage for miles and miles around, and prove a benefit to the village at large.

FIRST TROLLEY ARRIVES

Fonthill News

[People’s Press, 11 April 1907]

The first trolley car passed through Fonthill Monday morning amid much excitement. The flags flew and the crowd cheered. Several of the Fonthill citizens went down on the car for their first trip.

LOSSES IN HEATING

Value of Storm Windows is the Saving of Fuel

[Welland Tribune, 28 December 1916]

Owing to the rising price of coal and the need for heating our dwellings in winter, the cost of fuel is a large item of expense to the householder. Anything that can be done to reduce this cost without suffering inconvenience from the cold should be welcomed by all. The average householder has but little knowledge of the principles and application of heating, and there are many portions of Canada where the saving fuel by the use of storm windows {commonly known as double windows,} is not appreciated.

Heat is lost from a building in two ways, by {1} radiation, i.e. that transferred through walls, windows, and other exposed surfaces by conduction and lost, and {2} convection currents, or leakage, namely the losses through the openings around windows, doors, etc.

By the opening of outside doors much heat is lost. This, to a great extent, can be overcome by the use of storm outside doors. Better still is the storm porch which allows of one door being closed before the other is opened. This porch may be removable, to permit of the use of verandah space in summer.

The radiation loses are usually of greater importance then the convection. As loses due to radiation from walls, floor, ceiling and doors are determined by the structural features of the house, they are largely unavoidable. The most serious radiation loses are from windows and the saving of heat resulting from the use of storm windows is largely due to the layer of dead air-one of the best nonconductors –between the inner and the storm sashes. Storm windows also prevent uncomfortable drafts. …………

INCREASED PAY TO CANAL EMPLOYEES

[People’s Press 9 December 1902]

Mr. German’s efforts to obtain increased remuneration for employees of the Welland canal has been successful to a very appreciative and welcome extent at least. Hitherto the wages of laborers on the canal have been reduced from $1.50 to $1.25 during the winter months, beginning with November. Official notice has been received that hereafter the winter reduction will not be made; $1.50 per diem will be paid in winter as well as summer. Although but simple justice the concession is no less a welcome.

FIRST CONTRACT FOR MAGNIFICENT NEW CATHOLIC CHURCH AWARDED

To be Built in Sections and May Take Three Years to Build-Ultimate Cost About $45,000 or $50,000-First Sod Turned Today

[Welland Telegraph, 7 November 1913]

The cost of the new Roman Catholic Church to be built at the corner of Hellems Avenue and Griffith St. will be between forty-five and fifty thousand dollars. The church will be built in three sections and the contract for the basement, the first section, was let this morning to J.H. Gardner for $9955. The basement walls will be fourteen feet high.

The dimensions of the church are 140 feet long and 48 feet wide. It will be built entirely of stone and of Romanesque architecture. The second section will include the walls and roof and the third section the interior and decorations. Three years, it is expected will be required to complete the building. The basement will be in by February or March and the second section will be gone on with next spring.

The completed building will seat between six and seven hundred. This (Thursday) afternoon at four o’clock, the first sod will be turned by J.J. Patterson and Rev. Father Berardo will bless it. At the laying of the cornerstone there will be a ceremony and civic officials will be invited.

SKELETONS WERE FOUND

Workmen Excavate Coffins While Digging Trench

Interred Years Ago In Long Forgotten Cemetery On Mill Street-Bones Will Be Reburied.

[Welland Telegraph, 7 November 1913]

Buried about three feet beneath the surface two coffins containing human bones were found by workmen excavating a trench for a water service at the west end of Mill Street this morning.

The coffin has almost completely decayed and the bones within had the appearance of being in the earth for many years. A few buttons were found in one of the coffins and were bright and shiny. The skeletons were carefully removed and will be reburied in other boxes as near to their former resting place as possible. It is impossible to tell just how long ago burial was made but a tombstone on a lot not far distant bears the date 1861.

It is thought that the property was used as a cemetery many years ago by the Methodist Church. A number of fallen tombstones are standing in the vicinity.

WELLAND FIREMEN TO THE FRONT

Thorold News

[Welland Tribune, 28 August 1885]

Thorold celebrated her civic holiday on Wednesday with great eclat. The day proved fine, and an immense crowd of spectators gathered in town.

The principal features of the day were the Firemen’s display and games, and the Trades’ procession which was large, creditable and representative. Music was furnished by six bands. The street of the town were handsomely decorated and spammed by two beautiful arches, one at the firemen’s hall, the other near the Welland House. The latter was composed of ladders.

The Welland Firemen attended, accompanied by the Fenwick Band, and had the distinguished honor of winning both the hose reel race and the prize for best uniformed company, and that with the crack companies of St. Catharines and Niagara Falls South to compete with. In all six companies of firemen were present.

In the hose reel race the Welland team comprised Capt. Hutson, M. Vanderburgh, P.W. Raymer, G.B. Swayze, C. Eastman, B. Ellsworth, B. Doan, Thos. Hammond, Peter McMurray, George and Adam Bowman, Wm. Rosette and Wesley Doan.

Ed Rounds and John VanWyck acted as starters at the wheel and gave the “masheen” a hoist that hold well on the first fifty yards. The race was to run 300 yards, then lay 150 feet of hose and make two couplings. The time was: St. Catharines Neptunes, one minute thirty-one seconds; Welland Merritts, one minute nine seconds. The Merritts accord especial praise to their couplers, W. Rosette and Wes. Doan for their rapidity, which tended largely to the success won.

Credit is also due Capt. Ritter for the efficient manner in which he has drilled the company, making an almost incredible improvement during the past two or three weeks, which actually comprises their term of training.

The “boys” it is unnecessary to say, felt highly elated at their success, and returned with brooms aloft, indicative of the sweep made. Long may they wave.

LACROSSE – WELLAND V. PORT COLBORNE

[Welland Tribune, 28 August 1885]

The Port Colborne lacrosse club played the Wellanders here on Tuesday. The match was the most stubbornly contested ever witnessed on the grounds. After a long siege Welland scored and was allowed the first game. The ball was faced for the second game about 4 o’clock, play continuing until after six without result, when the match was declared closed. The wounded limped off or were helped from the field, and will no doubt be sufficiently recovered in a week or two for another brush. The members of both clubs fought like heroes from first to last, and the hatchet was not buried until the majority were too exhausted to play longer.