Welland History .ca

Historic EVENTS in and around Welland

The EVENTS in and around Welland

This is where you will find interesting stories of
various EVENTS in and around Welland.
Currently we have a lot of stories about
businesses and their owners in the 1800s and 1900s.

THE STEAMER LAKESIDE

Attempt To Burn the Vessel At Her Dock In St. Catharines-An Infernal Machine.

[Welland Tribune, 25 July 1897]

St. Catharines, June 20-An almost successful attempt was made about 11 o’clock on Saturday night to burn the steamer Lakeside as she lay at her wharf here. Most of the crew had retired, and the watchman was making his rounds when he heard a slight explosion in the vicinity of the boiler room, and turning suddenly found flames breaking out in all directions from the vessel. The hands were immediately aroused and set to work to fight the flames. The engineer started the pony engine and soon had two or three streams playing on the fire. The city firemen were also promptly on the scene and the flames were quickly drowned out. The damage to the boat will be about $300 and is covered by insurance. When daylight came this morning and the work of repairing was started the remains of an infernal machine were found in the boiler room.

FORT ERIE JOCKEY CLUB RACES

BRILLIANT SUCCESS UNABATED

[Welland Tribune, 25 June 1897]

The Fort Erie Jockey Club races are increasing in popularity daily, and it looks as if the meeting would go on record as one of the most brilliant in the annals of Canadian sports. Every day is a “big day,” but Jubilee day was a boomer.  It was essentially “Canadian’s day,” the province contributing to swell the crowd by at least two thousand people. The card hung up was all that could have been desired, the steeple chase combining all the exciting features necessary to enthuse the visitors. Two of the favorites fell at the jumps, and long shots won the race. The jockeys were not seriously injured, and when they again mounted, and rode to the finish, they were received with great applause. Local sports have been exceptionally fortunate in the betting-although it may be that the losers are not making a song of their losses. At any rate we hear of small loses and some snug wins. The success has been so complete that talk is already rife that the meeting may be prolonged beyond the advertised time-but this is not likely. It would be quite a card for the meeting to end up in a blaze of glory on Independence Day, (July 5) and leave the public with a keen appetite for another meeting later on. Good cards are on for the coming week, and extra crowds are expected on July 1st and 5th. But so far as the racing goes all days are good ones.

THE WABASH COMING EAST

RUNNING POWERS SECURED FROM DETROIT TO BUFFALO

Lease of the Grand Trunk and Erie Railway Tracks-First Trains Run on June 13

[Welland Tribune, 4 June 1897]

St. Louis, May 31- An announcement was made here this afternoon of one of the most important deals between railroads that has occurred for several years. The announcement is upon the authority of the officials of the Wabash Railway, and is to the effect that the Wabash has leased the use of the tracks of the Grand Trunk Railway in Canada between Windsor and the Suspension Bridge and also the use of the tracks of the Erie Railroad between the Suspension Bridge and Buffalo, thus extending the terminus of the Wabash eastward from Detroit to Buffalo. The lease becomes operative on Sunday, June 13, when two double trains will be run over the new extension. This arrangement has been in contemplation some time and the negotiations were satisfactorily closed last week. Wabash employees will control the trains over the entire route and through tickets will read between Buffalo and Kansas City.

The consideration, it is said in railroad circles, is $1,000 a mile per year rental, besides the payment of one-half of the maintenance charges of the division.

WILLIAM SCOFIELD

[Welland Tribune, 14 May 1897]

Windsor, May 10th-William Scofield of Belle River was struck by a Grand Trunk train at the Puce, 13 miles from Windsor, yesterday and killed. His body was discovered by Conductor Freeman in the ditch near the track, and taken to Belle River. He leaves a widow and five children.

MRS. FACER GETS $1,500

[Welland Tribune. 30 April 1897]

The accident on the T.H.& B. railway just west of Hamilton on the afternoon of Sept. 16th last, by which a locomotive and tender were completely wrecked and the engineer and fireman lost their lives, has proved decidedly expensive. Mrs. Edith Johnson, of the village of Scotland, widow of the dead fireman, George Johnson, sued the road for damages, and the company settled on Monday for $2,000 and $300 costs. Mrs. Johnson gets $1,500 and her daughter Lena, $500.

Mrs. Isabella Facer of Welland, widow of the engineer, James Facer, also sued for damages, and the company gave her $1.500 and $300 for costs, to settle the case.

THE BICYCLE BILL

[Welland Tribune, 23 April 1897]

This is the Ontario bicycle bill:

(a) In case a person travelling or being upon a highway in charge of a vehicle meets a person travelling upon a bicycle or tricycle he shall, where practicable, allow the person travelling upon a bicycle or tricycle sufficient room on the travelled portion of the highway to pass to the right.

(b) In case a person travelling upon a highway on a bicycle or tricycle overtakes any vehicle or horseman travelling at less speed or a person on foot, the former shall give an audible warning of his approach before attempting to pass.

© In case a bicyclist is overtaken by a vehicle or horseman going faster, the former shall quietly turn out to the right, and the latter to the left, far enough to avoid a collision in passing.

SEASON BEGINS AT THE FALLS

Unknown Youth Jumps from a Hack into the Niagara Rapids

[Welland Tribune, 23 April 1897]

Niagara Falls, Ont., April 17- A stranger 21 years of age, opened the season of suicides by jumping off the upper Suspension bridge at 12. 15 today. No one seems to know who he was of where he came from. A hackman named Dave Nickerson drove him to the Canadian side to see the sights. When about the centre of the bridge the man jumped out of the hack and with the words, “Here goes, good-bye,” he leaped over the bridge railing into the abyss below. The Hackman jumped off his hack and saw the man strike the field of floe ice that was being carried down with the current. The only evidence left by him was a brown Derby hat with the maker’s name inside, “Hall,” Boston. Nickerson says this man was well dressed and was tall, slight and fair of complexion.

LATER-The man who jumped from the Suspension bridge last Saturday has been identified as Ernest F. Markham of Boston, a member of the Boston Journal staff, Photographs of Markham received here today were at once identified. No reason is known for the fatal jump on Markham’s part.

RAILWAY

[Welland Tribune, 23 April 1897]

Two well-known and prominent railway men –J.G. Laven, Canadian passenger agent of the Michigan Central, and A. Drysdale, representing the Chicago & Alton-were in town on Monday. Of course they dropped into the M.C.R. town ticket office (F. Swayze & Son) and congratulated him on his remodeled and up-to-date business premises. Mr. Laven said arrangements for the new time table on the T.H. & B. branch had not yet been completed, but when the new card was issued he was sure the public would be pleased with the service offered. Fast trains will flit between Toronto and Buffalo in shorter time than ever known before, and the accommodation will be such as the Michigan central provides for its patrons-unsurpassed. Some of the trains will run via the Falls while others will take the more direct line from Welland to Buffalo via the International bridge. No doubt every train will stop at Welland, thus giving the county town connections that will equal those of any town in the country. The new time-card will be published in the TRIBUNE as soon as issued.

ROSS STORE

[Welland Tribune, 23 April 1897]

Important changes have recently been made in the arrangement of the Ross Co. store premises, which gives the enterprising management an opportunity to show the firm’s large stock to advantage. The upper floor has been refitted for the reception of ready-made clothing, mantles, carpets, curtains, oil-cloths, curtain-poles etc., and patrons can select and inspect those goods with ease. The removal of some of these departments to the upper flat gives better room below for the display of dry goods, hats and caps and general furnishings, and makes a striking improvement in the appearance of the entire store. The Ross Co., have purchased heavily this spring, and every line will be found well filled with new goods-at prices that should prevent any shrewd buyer from sending money out of town for such goods. We congratulate the Ross firm on the up-to-date re-arrangement of their popular store, and the public will certainly appreciate the better facilities offered for carefully inspecting before selecting their purchases.

SWAYZE & SON

SWAYZE & SON

[Welland Tribune, 23 April 1897]

The improvements to the business office of Swayze & Son have now been fully completed, and the premises are convenient, bright and in every way up-to-date and city-like. The walls and woodwork have been neatly tinted, the floors covered with matting, the counters rearranged and the whole interior finished in modern style. The large insurance business, as well as the M.C.R. ticket agency, will be well looked after under the careful and experienced personal supervision of G.B. Swayze, with Miss Hooker as assistant. The important addition of the Canadian Life agency to Messrs. Swayze’s business makes their office a busy one in matters relative to insurance of life and property, and the new improvements will facilitate business very much.