Welland History .ca

Historic EVENTS in and around Welland

Results for ‘Businesses’

PROPOSAL TO BUILD SUBWAY UNDER RAILWAY TRACKS ON MUIR STREET

Spitzer-Rorick Company Notified By Council to Take Up Hydro Debentures or Stand Loss on Re-sale-Welland Street to be Opened Over G.T.R.-Advertise for Tenders for Next Year’s Paving.

[Welland Telegraph, 7 November 1913]

SEEN AT A GLANCE

The Council:

  • Discussed $20,000 viaduct, under the railway tracks on Muir St.
  • Protested against trains blocking crossing on Muir Street and re-affirmed their request for overhead bridges.
  • Gave notice of building debenture company liable for loss on sale.
  • Called for tenders for next year’s paving.
  • Referred subdivision plans to engineer for general layout.
  • Decided to open Welland St. over the G.T.R.
  • Heard mayor announce that he would give instructions to have curfew law enforced.
  • Gave chief of police two weeks holidays.

For the town of Welland, the township of Crowland, the M.C.R. the local railway company to jointly share the cost of a subway under the railway tracks crossing Muir Street was a suggestion given consideration at the council meeting Monday evening.

The proposal was brought about by a communication from the Dominion Railway Board stating that an overhead bridge over the tracks a suggested by the council was not feasible for the reason the pedestrians would not use it because of the height of the ascent necessary.

The board stated that approval had been given the request of the electric railway to cross at grade, but the M.C.R. was raising strong objections and it was now proposed to have the street railway be a subway under the tracks. To protect pedestrians crossing the tracks at Muir street and at Plymouth Road the railway would be willing to pay the same proportion as at present for gates to be operated day and night at Muir Street and to have the gates at Plymouth Road continued in operation at night as well as in the daytime.

“Crowland would consent to this arrangement,” advised the solicitor.

After the last fatal accident at the Muir Street crossing a flagman was stationed there and the board has not yet given an order for his release.

TRAINS BLOCK CROSSING

Deputy Reeve Crow explained that the idea of the gates was to give workingmen going across to the factories a chance to get across the tracks when the crossing was blocked by trains.

Aud. Hughes said the public was a better judge as to the accessibly of these crossings and the public wanted the overhead bridges.

“If the railway blocks the crossing we should summon witnesses and prosecute,” opned Ald. Reilly.

The solicitor was instructed to review suggestions to have the bridges built and to advise the board that the town favored the gates and the arrangement of payment.

WOULD COST $20,000

C.J. Laughlin proposed the scheme for building a viaduct. The cost would be about $20,000 but it could be borne jointly. There would have to be sixteen-foot clearance and the railway could raise its tracks up a distance, commencing the grade a thousand feet back. This would eliminate further trouble.

“We are now considering the building of a private subway for our line half way between the canal and Muir Street,” he said.

HOLD DEBENTURE CO. LIABLE

The council decided to give the Spitzer-Rorick Company notice to either take up the $40,000 received…. Hydro Electric debentures used would again advertise them for sale and hold the company liable for the loss occasioned by the re-sale.

NEXT YEAR’S PAVING

Instructions were given the engineers to advertise for tenders for paving North Main Street, Division Street, Hellems Avenue, Cross Street and Burgar Street, between main and Division.

The kinds of pavement on which tenders are to be received are brick, rocmac, asphalt, bitulithic, concrete and reinforced concrete.

Ald. Hughes explained that sewers on these streets could be put down this fall and that the water commission were now putting down their connections.

A motion to have the sewer connection on these streets put in was carried.

“Is it the intention of the council to pave North Main?” asked Deputy Reeve Crow.

“Yes,” replied Ald. Hatt. “We are making temporary improvements on the street this fall out as far as Elm, which is as far as the pavement will extend. From there to the end, the street is being made permanent with stone.”

DOESN’T FAVOR CONCRETE

D.T. Black, city engineer, in his report on the kinds of pavement, said concrete was short-lived unless reinforced and then it would cost as much as any other pavement. Cracks would develop and the abrasive action wear away the surface. He thought it better to use some other kind of paving.

FROWN ON SUBDIVISION

A motion to approve of the plans of Welled Heights subdivision was replaced with a reference to the engineer after the council had fully discussed it. The streets are not in accordance with older streets already laid out and the council felt that permission to open such streets would lead to trouble, expense and confusion in the future.

Ald. Hughes was surprised that the street committee would recommend the acceptance of such a plan.

Ald. Reilly complained about the lots being small but his entire objection was to the irregularity of the streets. “They are not streets, but pockets,” he said.

“They are sixty-six feet wide,” said Ald. Hatt. “We have nothing to say about the size of the lots.”

Ald. Traver said such subdivisions had a tendency to scatter the town and run up the cost of local improvements.

The engineer will make arrangements to have the streets in the property conform to other and established streets and make such preparations that any other property nearby if opened in the future must be in harmony with the general plan. All streets must also be opened out.

NEW SEWERS

The sewer committee were instructed to advertise for tenders for sewers on Fraser, Edward, Hooker, Welland and Cady Streets and to put in sewer services on Division, Hellems Ave., North Main and Burgar Streets.

OPEN UP NEW STREET

Welland Street will be opened over the G.T.R. tracks, is spite of a letter from the G.T.R. stating that yards might be opened at that point and giving preference to Asher St., as a crossing over their tracks, the council decided that Welland Street would be the most advantageous place for the new crossing.

The street committee were instructed to take the necessary steps to have the street opened. Property from Burgar Street to the track must be expropriated.

FIRM OF HILL & HILL

Humberstone News

[Welland Tribune, 4 January 1895]

Mr. W.M. Hill, the enterprising and hustling senior partner of Hill & Hill, is now sole proprietor of the business in this village-the firm of Hill & Hill having dissolved on Wednesday and Mr. W.M. Hill succeeding to the business. It is a well-known fact that the latter gentleman has always been the business head of the firm, and with full control of the management the Hill store should rank as a leader more decidedly than ever. Mr. Hill’s enterprise has built up a large trade which, under his sole management must show marked increase in the future as it has in the past. We congratulate the village on retaining a store that will always be the means of drawing patronage for miles and miles around, and prove a benefit to the village at large.

FIRST TROLLEY ARRIVES

Fonthill News

[People’s Press, 11 April 1907]

The first trolley car passed through Fonthill Monday morning amid much excitement. The flags flew and the crowd cheered. Several of the Fonthill citizens went down on the car for their first trip.

LOSSES IN HEATING

Value of Storm Windows is the Saving of Fuel

[Welland Tribune, 28 December 1916]

Owing to the rising price of coal and the need for heating our dwellings in winter, the cost of fuel is a large item of expense to the householder. Anything that can be done to reduce this cost without suffering inconvenience from the cold should be welcomed by all. The average householder has but little knowledge of the principles and application of heating, and there are many portions of Canada where the saving fuel by the use of storm windows {commonly known as double windows,} is not appreciated.

Heat is lost from a building in two ways, by {1} radiation, i.e. that transferred through walls, windows, and other exposed surfaces by conduction and lost, and {2} convection currents, or leakage, namely the losses through the openings around windows, doors, etc.

By the opening of outside doors much heat is lost. This, to a great extent, can be overcome by the use of storm outside doors. Better still is the storm porch which allows of one door being closed before the other is opened. This porch may be removable, to permit of the use of verandah space in summer.

The radiation loses are usually of greater importance then the convection. As loses due to radiation from walls, floor, ceiling and doors are determined by the structural features of the house, they are largely unavoidable. The most serious radiation loses are from windows and the saving of heat resulting from the use of storm windows is largely due to the layer of dead air-one of the best nonconductors –between the inner and the storm sashes. Storm windows also prevent uncomfortable drafts. …………

INCREASED PAY TO CANAL EMPLOYEES

[People’s Press 9 December 1902]

Mr. German’s efforts to obtain increased remuneration for employees of the Welland canal has been successful to a very appreciative and welcome extent at least. Hitherto the wages of laborers on the canal have been reduced from $1.50 to $1.25 during the winter months, beginning with November. Official notice has been received that hereafter the winter reduction will not be made; $1.50 per diem will be paid in winter as well as summer. Although but simple justice the concession is no less a welcome.

FIRST CONTRACT FOR MAGNIFICENT NEW CATHOLIC CHURCH AWARDED

To be Built in Sections and May Take Three Years to Build-Ultimate Cost About $45,000 or $50,000-First Sod Turned Today

[Welland Telegraph, 7 November 1913]

The cost of the new Roman Catholic Church to be built at the corner of Hellems Avenue and Griffith St. will be between forty-five and fifty thousand dollars. The church will be built in three sections and the contract for the basement, the first section, was let this morning to J.H. Gardner for $9955. The basement walls will be fourteen feet high.

The dimensions of the church are 140 feet long and 48 feet wide. It will be built entirely of stone and of Romanesque architecture. The second section will include the walls and roof and the third section the interior and decorations. Three years, it is expected will be required to complete the building. The basement will be in by February or March and the second section will be gone on with next spring.

The completed building will seat between six and seven hundred. This (Thursday) afternoon at four o’clock, the first sod will be turned by J.J. Patterson and Rev. Father Berardo will bless it. At the laying of the cornerstone there will be a ceremony and civic officials will be invited.

BROWN BROS’ ROLLER MILLS

IN PERFECT RUNNING ORDER

[Welland Tribune, 28 August 1885]

Brown Bros’ Flouring Mills have been refitted throughout and furnished with twelve sets of rolls of the well-known Ellison manufacture, Milwaukee; also four purifiers, six reels (scalping), two centrific reels, bran duster, two wheat scourers and a separator, all except the rolls from the Geo. T. Smith Mfg. Co., Stratford. The roller process and its results are almost too well known to require explanation. The first roll merely cracks the grain. From this it is passed through the respective rolls and machinery, until the product is turned out as the very finest “patent process” flour made, the residue being made into the several grades of flour and feed known to commerce. These mills are fitted with the most modern and improved engine, weighing and packing processes and machinery throughout, with a capacity from 100 barrels of flour a day upward. The rolls and machinery have been put in under the foremanship of Mr. Geo. T. Skene; and was started on Monday, and works exceptionally smoothly and satisfactorily for new machinery. The grade of flour turned out is pronounced strictly first-class; fully the equal of that produced by any roller mill in Canada, without exception. The church opposite has been leased for a storehouse and is now the receptacle of a large quantity of wheat. Messrs. Brown Bros. contemplates connecting it with their mill, by a frameway which will prove a great advantage.

The mill will give steady employment to six men when worked to full capacity, besides affording a local market for grain, a much needed desideratum, as farmers largely do their trading where they sell their wheat. It must therefore be of material advantage to the town, and we trust it will prove equally remunerative and satisfactory to its enterprising proprietors. The firm now advertise to pay Thorold and St. Catharines prices for wheat, and are taking in large quantities.

THE WABASH COMING EAST

RUNNING POWERS SECURED FROM DETROIT TO BUFFALO

Lease of the Grand Trunk and Erie Railway Tracks-First Trains Run on June 13

[Welland Tribune, 4 June 1897]

St. Louis, May 31- An announcement was made here this afternoon of one of the most important deals between railroads that has occurred for several years. The announcement is upon the authority of the officials of the Wabash Railway, and is to the effect that the Wabash has leased the use of the tracks of the Grand Trunk Railway in Canada between Windsor and the Suspension Bridge and also the use of the tracks of the Erie Railroad between the Suspension Bridge and Buffalo, thus extending the terminus of the Wabash eastward from Detroit to Buffalo. The lease becomes operative on Sunday, June 13, when two double trains will be run over the new extension. This arrangement has been in contemplation some time and the negotiations were satisfactorily closed last week. Wabash employees will control the trains over the entire route and through tickets will read between Buffalo and Kansas City.

The consideration, it is said in railroad circles, is $1,000 a mile per year rental, besides the payment of one-half of the maintenance charges of the division.

THE BICYCLE BILL

[Welland Tribune, 23 April 1897]

This is the Ontario bicycle bill:

(a) In case a person travelling or being upon a highway in charge of a vehicle meets a person travelling upon a bicycle or tricycle he shall, where practicable, allow the person travelling upon a bicycle or tricycle sufficient room on the travelled portion of the highway to pass to the right.

(b) In case a person travelling upon a highway on a bicycle or tricycle overtakes any vehicle or horseman travelling at less speed or a person on foot, the former shall give an audible warning of his approach before attempting to pass.

© In case a bicyclist is overtaken by a vehicle or horseman going faster, the former shall quietly turn out to the right, and the latter to the left, far enough to avoid a collision in passing.

RAILWAY

[Welland Tribune, 23 April 1897]

Two well-known and prominent railway men –J.G. Laven, Canadian passenger agent of the Michigan Central, and A. Drysdale, representing the Chicago & Alton-were in town on Monday. Of course they dropped into the M.C.R. town ticket office (F. Swayze & Son) and congratulated him on his remodeled and up-to-date business premises. Mr. Laven said arrangements for the new time table on the T.H. & B. branch had not yet been completed, but when the new card was issued he was sure the public would be pleased with the service offered. Fast trains will flit between Toronto and Buffalo in shorter time than ever known before, and the accommodation will be such as the Michigan central provides for its patrons-unsurpassed. Some of the trains will run via the Falls while others will take the more direct line from Welland to Buffalo via the International bridge. No doubt every train will stop at Welland, thus giving the county town connections that will equal those of any town in the country. The new time-card will be published in the TRIBUNE as soon as issued.