Welland History .ca

Historic EVENTS in and around Welland

Results for ‘Businesses’

GOOD ROADS

[Welland Tribune, 2 April 1897]

Editor Welland Tribune:
Niagara Falls, Ont..,
24th March, 1897

DEAR SIR,- I would like to see the influence of the TRIBUNE enlisted in the cause of good roads and would suggest that I call the attention of all pathmasters in the county to the importance of scraping the roads at the earliest possible moment after they become dry enough. To anyone who takes an interest in the subject it must be apparent that much of the statute labor is worse than a farce, but a timely use of a scraper before the roads become hard in an absolute necessity on clay roads if they are to be smooth for the summer. The labor required for this kind of road work is insignificant and the results as compared with the usual plowing and scraping are so marked that the wonder is that it should be necessary to urge pathmasters to put it in practice. There is probably not one section of road in ten that ever has a scraping in the spring. I would suggest that you put a few lines on the subject along with the matter from your different country correspondents each week from now until the roads become too hard to scrape. In this way the matter would force itself upon those whose business it is to give us good roads but who as a rule do more harm than good.

Yours truly

E.W. Tench

FONTHILL NEWS

[Welland Tribune, 9 April 1897]

Thos. Gracey has moved on Mrs. A.B. Kinsman’s farm, in house lately occupied by Samuel Gould, now living in Welland. Fred Fisher and family have moved in the house which Mr. Gracey vacated.

TOWN OF WELLAND – VOTER’S LIST

[Welland Tribune, 28 August 1885]

The Town of Welland voters’ list has just been printed, and an analysis of it will be interesting as giving details respecting the growth and development of the town. The increase is not large, it is true, but it is satisfactory “these times” to know that we are not retrograding-that at least some progress is indicted. And just here we may say, that there has been a far greater advancement in town in the way of adding to, and improving and ornamenting premises, than in mere increase in population.

The number of voters on this year’s list is 657 as against 632 last year-a gain of 25. From the following synopsis of the list for the current year, it will be seen that the standing of the town is very even in all parts:-

No. 1….1884-147   1885-148
No. 2….1884-173   1885-185
No. 3….1884-154   1885-162
No. 4….1884-158   1885-162

This includes municipal voters (women) in both cases. Of these there are this year 41, apportioned ten to each division except Ward No. 3, which has the honor of possessing the old lady wielder of the ballot.

Wards 1 and 2 are on the east side of the canal; Wards 3 and 4 on the west side. The showing between the sides of the canal is therefore as follows:

East side Canal…..333 Increase- 13
West side Canal….324 Increase-12

In other words, the east side, which had a majority of 8 last year has increased its lead to 9.

NEW BUSINESS

[Welland Tribune, 28 August 1885]

We understand Mr. H.W. Hobson intends going into the stationery trade, and will open out a fist-class stock (in connection with his drug business) about Sept. 15th. His goods will be new and well selected, and his prices right.

POPULATION-TOWN OF WELLAND

[Welland Tribune, 16 March 1894]

March 1894-As taken by special census taker Elias H. Burgar.

Ward 1-375
Ward 2-544-919 east side
Ward 3-424
Ward 4-508-932 west side

Total: 1851

The above does not include the population within the gaol, which amounted to 41 yesterday. There was no attempt made to take any except bona fide residents of the town-the market, trains etc., were not drawn upon as has been done elsewhere in times past.

PROPOSAL TO BUILD SUBWAY UNDER RAILWAY TRACKS ON MUIR STREET

Spitzer-Rorick Company Notified By Council to Take Up Hydro Debentures or Stand Loss on Re-sale-Welland Street to be Opened Over G.T.R.-Advertise for Tenders for Next Year’s Paving.

[Welland Telegraph, 7 November 1913]

SEEN AT A GLANCE

The Council:

  • Discussed $20,000 viaduct, under the railway tracks on Muir St.
  • Protested against trains blocking crossing on Muir Street and re-affirmed their request for overhead bridges.
  • Gave notice of building debenture company liable for loss on sale.
  • Called for tenders for next year’s paving.
  • Referred subdivision plans to engineer for general layout.
  • Decided to open Welland St. over the G.T.R.
  • Heard mayor announce that he would give instructions to have curfew law enforced.
  • Gave chief of police two weeks holidays.

For the town of Welland, the township of Crowland, the M.C.R. the local railway company to jointly share the cost of a subway under the railway tracks crossing Muir Street was a suggestion given consideration at the council meeting Monday evening.

The proposal was brought about by a communication from the Dominion Railway Board stating that an overhead bridge over the tracks a suggested by the council was not feasible for the reason the pedestrians would not use it because of the height of the ascent necessary.

The board stated that approval had been given the request of the electric railway to cross at grade, but the M.C.R. was raising strong objections and it was now proposed to have the street railway be a subway under the tracks. To protect pedestrians crossing the tracks at Muir street and at Plymouth Road the railway would be willing to pay the same proportion as at present for gates to be operated day and night at Muir Street and to have the gates at Plymouth Road continued in operation at night as well as in the daytime.

“Crowland would consent to this arrangement,” advised the solicitor.

After the last fatal accident at the Muir Street crossing a flagman was stationed there and the board has not yet given an order for his release.

TRAINS BLOCK CROSSING

Deputy Reeve Crow explained that the idea of the gates was to give workingmen going across to the factories a chance to get across the tracks when the crossing was blocked by trains.

Aud. Hughes said the public was a better judge as to the accessibly of these crossings and the public wanted the overhead bridges.

“If the railway blocks the crossing we should summon witnesses and prosecute,” opned Ald. Reilly.

The solicitor was instructed to review suggestions to have the bridges built and to advise the board that the town favored the gates and the arrangement of payment.

WOULD COST $20,000

C.J. Laughlin proposed the scheme for building a viaduct. The cost would be about $20,000 but it could be borne jointly. There would have to be sixteen-foot clearance and the railway could raise its tracks up a distance, commencing the grade a thousand feet back. This would eliminate further trouble.

“We are now considering the building of a private subway for our line half way between the canal and Muir Street,” he said.

HOLD DEBENTURE CO. LIABLE

The council decided to give the Spitzer-Rorick Company notice to either take up the $40,000 received…. Hydro Electric debentures used would again advertise them for sale and hold the company liable for the loss occasioned by the re-sale.

NEXT YEAR’S PAVING

Instructions were given the engineers to advertise for tenders for paving North Main Street, Division Street, Hellems Avenue, Cross Street and Burgar Street, between main and Division.

The kinds of pavement on which tenders are to be received are brick, rocmac, asphalt, bitulithic, concrete and reinforced concrete.

Ald. Hughes explained that sewers on these streets could be put down this fall and that the water commission were now putting down their connections.

A motion to have the sewer connection on these streets put in was carried.

“Is it the intention of the council to pave North Main?” asked Deputy Reeve Crow.

“Yes,” replied Ald. Hatt. “We are making temporary improvements on the street this fall out as far as Elm, which is as far as the pavement will extend. From there to the end, the street is being made permanent with stone.”

DOESN’T FAVOR CONCRETE

D.T. Black, city engineer, in his report on the kinds of pavement, said concrete was short-lived unless reinforced and then it would cost as much as any other pavement. Cracks would develop and the abrasive action wear away the surface. He thought it better to use some other kind of paving.

FROWN ON SUBDIVISION

A motion to approve of the plans of Welled Heights subdivision was replaced with a reference to the engineer after the council had fully discussed it. The streets are not in accordance with older streets already laid out and the council felt that permission to open such streets would lead to trouble, expense and confusion in the future.

Ald. Hughes was surprised that the street committee would recommend the acceptance of such a plan.

Ald. Reilly complained about the lots being small but his entire objection was to the irregularity of the streets. “They are not streets, but pockets,” he said.

“They are sixty-six feet wide,” said Ald. Hatt. “We have nothing to say about the size of the lots.”

Ald. Traver said such subdivisions had a tendency to scatter the town and run up the cost of local improvements.

The engineer will make arrangements to have the streets in the property conform to other and established streets and make such preparations that any other property nearby if opened in the future must be in harmony with the general plan. All streets must also be opened out.

NEW SEWERS

The sewer committee were instructed to advertise for tenders for sewers on Fraser, Edward, Hooker, Welland and Cady Streets and to put in sewer services on Division, Hellems Ave., North Main and Burgar Streets.

OPEN UP NEW STREET

Welland Street will be opened over the G.T.R. tracks, is spite of a letter from the G.T.R. stating that yards might be opened at that point and giving preference to Asher St., as a crossing over their tracks, the council decided that Welland Street would be the most advantageous place for the new crossing.

The street committee were instructed to take the necessary steps to have the street opened. Property from Burgar Street to the track must be expropriated.

FIRM OF HILL & HILL

Humberstone News

[Welland Tribune, 4 January 1895]

Mr. W.M. Hill, the enterprising and hustling senior partner of Hill & Hill, is now sole proprietor of the business in this village-the firm of Hill & Hill having dissolved on Wednesday and Mr. W.M. Hill succeeding to the business. It is a well-known fact that the latter gentleman has always been the business head of the firm, and with full control of the management the Hill store should rank as a leader more decidedly than ever. Mr. Hill’s enterprise has built up a large trade which, under his sole management must show marked increase in the future as it has in the past. We congratulate the village on retaining a store that will always be the means of drawing patronage for miles and miles around, and prove a benefit to the village at large.

FIRST TROLLEY ARRIVES

Fonthill News

[People’s Press, 11 April 1907]

The first trolley car passed through Fonthill Monday morning amid much excitement. The flags flew and the crowd cheered. Several of the Fonthill citizens went down on the car for their first trip.

LOSSES IN HEATING

Value of Storm Windows is the Saving of Fuel

[Welland Tribune, 28 December 1916]

Owing to the rising price of coal and the need for heating our dwellings in winter, the cost of fuel is a large item of expense to the householder. Anything that can be done to reduce this cost without suffering inconvenience from the cold should be welcomed by all. The average householder has but little knowledge of the principles and application of heating, and there are many portions of Canada where the saving fuel by the use of storm windows {commonly known as double windows,} is not appreciated.

Heat is lost from a building in two ways, by {1} radiation, i.e. that transferred through walls, windows, and other exposed surfaces by conduction and lost, and {2} convection currents, or leakage, namely the losses through the openings around windows, doors, etc.

By the opening of outside doors much heat is lost. This, to a great extent, can be overcome by the use of storm outside doors. Better still is the storm porch which allows of one door being closed before the other is opened. This porch may be removable, to permit of the use of verandah space in summer.

The radiation loses are usually of greater importance then the convection. As loses due to radiation from walls, floor, ceiling and doors are determined by the structural features of the house, they are largely unavoidable. The most serious radiation loses are from windows and the saving of heat resulting from the use of storm windows is largely due to the layer of dead air-one of the best nonconductors –between the inner and the storm sashes. Storm windows also prevent uncomfortable drafts. …………

INCREASED PAY TO CANAL EMPLOYEES

[People’s Press 9 December 1902]

Mr. German’s efforts to obtain increased remuneration for employees of the Welland canal has been successful to a very appreciative and welcome extent at least. Hitherto the wages of laborers on the canal have been reduced from $1.50 to $1.25 during the winter months, beginning with November. Official notice has been received that hereafter the winter reduction will not be made; $1.50 per diem will be paid in winter as well as summer. Although but simple justice the concession is no less a welcome.